sharpchick_2011: (Troll)
[personal profile] sharpchick_2011
Having jettisoned (or been jettisoned by - I think it depends on your sense of timing) the neurologist with the god complex, and failing over the course of five weeks to be able to find one who can see me in any reasonable amount of time, I backed up and reconsidered.

I'll be seeing a general practice physician on June 14 who has a reputation for appropriate referrals for the management of pain, as well as listening to his patients and engaging in actual dialog.

Catch me please, as I swoon...One of the things I need him to do is continue my prescription for physical therapy.

In the meantime, I still have one refill of neurontin at way too low a dose to treat neuropathic pain, but I take it anyway to maintain my blood level, because I intend to ask the new doc to increase the dose and we'll see if I'm one of the 30% of people who get any relief from it.

I continue to research alternative therapies for pain and edema, trying some which, even if they don't work, still won't hurt me.



I started looking for topical analgesics. Some of the people with fibromyalgia recommended recommended arnica gel. That was very uncomfortable and made my already stretched and swollen skin feel even tighter.

So I gave it to my son.

Aspercreme did nothing, zip, nada, zilch.

So I gave it to my son.

I thought maybe something with lidocaine might be beneficial, so I got some Banana Boat Cool Zone Sport, which has aloe and lidocaine.

Nope. So I will give it to my son. Are you seeing a pattern here? He is...

One of my internet searches turned up Overtime Pain Relief Lotion, which is mostly menthol and capsaicin.

Lots of menthol. The aroma causes the cottage felines to snort and turn up their small noses in disgust, glaring at me with watery eyes from their comfortable perches.

It's an interesting sensation - not at all uncomfortable, but quite distracting. I'm not sure if it's anesthetizing, but it sure distracts me from the pain and burning. So I'm still using it.

And the more I read about stellate ganglion nerve blocks, the less inclined I am to go that - very expensive and frequently ineffective - route.

Chronic pain message boards are all agog about topricin.

Well, Google that stuff...I know it's homeopathic and the dilutions are just 1/30th, but I'm not putting something on my skin made with cobra and Gila monster venom, no matter what dilution is used.

The compression glove has been a stellar success. I ordered and received a backup, and wash them about every other day to keep them tight.

There were instant results with the edema. But I still have pitting edema along the backs of my knuckles extending down my hand about halfway, and edema in my wrist.

Although the pitting edema can provide an interesting way to pass the time while waiting - push on the spot and count how long it takes the hole to fill in...one one thousand, two one thousand, three one thousand - I'd like to get rid of it. It's slowing down the physical therapy.

I thought about asking new doc to prescribe a course of Lasix, and started reading about its side effects. Not pretty.

So I started looking for natural diuretic foods and beverages. Turns out there are a whole bunch of them, most of which I love. I'm drinking at least two 6 ounce glasses of pure pineapple juice a day now (it has potassium in it, so I don't have to worry about flushing all mine out), and eating leafy greens, asparagus, watermelon, grapes, strawberries, and canteloupe.

And buying lots of cabbage.

For poultices. Blew me away to see that support organizations for lactating mothers dealing with engorgement and lymphedema support groups endorsed it. I figured if it didn't work, I'd call my son over for coleslaw.

It works. I've used it each evening this week, and it's reduced the edema even more. I can see my knuckles now, and am starting to see the bone structure in the back of my hand. Results are supposed to be more long-lasting if you apply the poultice multiple times a day.

Not really practical for the office, but I'll take what I can get.

The "old wives" were right on point with this one.

The journey is good.

It's even better if you stop long enough to take it one step at a time.

Namaste.

Date: 2012-05-26 03:48 am (UTC)
oakmouse: (Default)
From: [personal profile] oakmouse
Congratulations on finding some things that work for part of it, even if you haven't managed to fix it all yet. I hope you manage to continue making progress until it's entirely gone.

If Overtime Pain Relief Lotion helps, you might see if you can find some Tiger Balm. DO NOT get it on mucous membranes (because it hurts), but it's fine on regular skin. IMO it works very well for some types of otherwise intractable pain, especially nerve pain --- and it's a mix of camphor, menthol, and capsaicin.

Date: 2012-05-26 01:27 pm (UTC)
hrafn: (Default)
From: [personal profile] hrafn
I laughed at "I'd call my son over for coleslaw."

I did not know cabbage could be used that way (as an anti-swelling poultice; I know about coleslaw), but I've used onion on swelling with good results.

Damn, it sucks it's been so long and you haven't been able to get better help from the medical profession; I hope the June 14th visit goes well.

Date: 2012-05-26 03:19 pm (UTC)
hrafn: (Default)
From: [personal profile] hrafn
The regular yellow ones, because that's usually what I buy to cook with.

Date: 2012-05-28 02:39 am (UTC)
rainbow: drawing of a pink furred cat person with purple eyes and heart shaped glasses. their name is catastrfy. (Default)
From: [personal profile] rainbow
comfrey leaf compresses are sometimes helpful with rsd (and usually helpful in wound healing). some folks layer comfrey compresses with comfrey balm or arnica balm.

*vibes* offered.

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